IndyCars at Daytona in 1959

Discussion in 'Open Wheel Racing' started by gnomesayin, Apr 8, 2019.

  1. gnomesayin

    gnomesayin Team Owner

    Some great photos and history in this little feature. It's crazy that this happened at all.

     
    Marcingak, Greg, LewTheShoe and 4 others like this.
  2. FLRacingFan

    FLRacingFan Team Owner

    Almost 180 MPH in 1959...nearly 30 MPH quicker than they were doing at IMS. That’s nuts.
     
    LewTheShoe, gnomesayin and Kiante like this.
  3. Zerkfitting

    Zerkfitting Team Owner

    I think that is part of the reason they don't race there. I can't imagine what speeds they could reach today.
     
    LewTheShoe likes this.
  4. kkfan91

    kkfan91 Taking a 10-200

    Well they hit 240 when California opened with Cart
     
  5. Zerkfitting

    Zerkfitting Team Owner

    I remember that. I think they said at 240 a driver couldn't react fast enough to avoid a problem and the other end of a straight.
     
    FLRacingFan likes this.
  6. FLRacingFan

    FLRacingFan Team Owner

    If they ran with the current cars I think they'd also top out around 240 or so, probably a little bit above that. The G-forces on the massive banking would probably be too much physically like what got the 2001 CART race at Texas cancelled.
     
    gnomesayin and Zerkfitting like this.
  7. gnomesayin

    gnomesayin Team Owner

    Another cool historical video in this series, somewhat misleadingly titled because a Talladega IndyCar race never came that close to happening, but containing many interesting and zany details about the mess of the first big IndyCar split in 1979-1980, such as the fact that NASCAR and NHRA pursued the rights to sanction the Indy 500 in 1981.

     
    Zerkfitting and LewTheShoe like this.
  8. Snappy D

    Snappy D 2017 Pick Em Champion 2018 Bold Predictor

    Could Indy Car run the Roval or still the G Forces on the banking would be too much? Gosh I would love to see those cars scream off turn 4 on the front straight and then brake to get into the infield portion of the course.
     

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