modern cars need 30 seconds to warm up???

DanicaFreak

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2014/12/29/the-biggest-winter-energy-myth-that-you-need-to-idle-your-car-before-driving/


dling in winter thus has no benefit to your (presumably modern) car. Auto experts today say that you should warm up the car no more than 30 seconds before you start driving in winter. "The engine will warm up faster being driven," the EPA and DOE explain. Indeed, it is better to turn your engine off and start it again than to leave it idling. (As many readers pointed out after this post was first published, it's always important to be careful driving in winter, and clear your windshield of any ice.)

not sure about this.....

https://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/car-technology/a19086/warming-up-your-car-in-the-cold-just-harms-engine/

Seems its a hold over from carburetor engines
 

be9ak7ts16

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I like getting into a warm vehicle and this Jeep I just got has a remote start. 5-10 minutes and I’m toasty warm
 
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BobbyFord

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It doesn’t get super cold here but I can fire up my carbureted vehicles in the low 30s and drop them into gear and drive off, no stalling or sputtering.
 

Greg

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Aside from getting the defroster going and clearing the windows I do not warm up. We also do not get many sub freezing temps in South Carolina and I am not cold natured. If it is bad I can wear gloves and run the seat heaters too, but that never happens.

I am estimating that it usually takes about 5 minutes or about 2 to 3 miles to get up to optimal engine heat. Usually at 5 am the traffic is not to bad and I can feather foot the throttle on the secondary roads before I get to the interstate. I am not sure how long it takes for the transmission and rear end lubrication to heat up to the optimal temps and I may try to research the topic.

I usually take off slow and limit the RPMs in the truck to save on the gas. I have a crew cab 2015 Z71 4 W/D and I have become almost a nerd about optimizing the gas milage. I even try to anticipate red light timing in order to prevent coming to a complete stop. I usually get about 19 mpg. My brother laughs at me because I have been a speed demon all of my life and this is a complete reversal for me. Note I do hate following slow cars that will not get out of the way and I drive normally when in traffic. But if there is a clear passing lane available for them to use I am optimizing.

My wife has a Camry and she warms it up for 10 minutes even when the weather is in the 40s, or lower. But I am not to worried it has a 4 cylindar and the milage is good. It is also serviced routinely and those Toyota 4 cylinder engines are almost indestructible.
 

DanicaFreak

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I think that the article means even in -20 or more only 20 secs is all that is needed
 

Zerkfitting

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My car automatically runs at a higher RPM for about 15 seconds then drops down to idle when the engine is cold.

I've noticed more people are using remote starters to get their car warm in winter (there are people in MN that don't deal with the cold very well). I don't like to waste gas and a car will warms up faster when under load. I've discovered heated seats make a difference in comfort, I've heard that a heated steering wheel is pretty sweet. When it is way below zero I need to take time to get the transmission fluid warmed up, it can get so cold here that the tranny won't shift.
 

DanicaFreak

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My car automatically runs at a higher RPM for about 15 seconds then drops down to idle when the engine is cold.

I've noticed more people are using remote starters to get their car warm in winter (there are people in MN that don't deal with the cold very well). I don't like to waste gas and a car will warms up faster when under load. I've discovered heated seats make a difference in comfort, I've heard that a heated steering wheel is pretty sweet. When it is way below zero I need to take time to get the transmission fluid warmed up, it can get so cold here that the tranny won't shift.
+1 Zerk.
 
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