Dale Jr. & family survive plane crash

Jorge De Guzman

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Glad him and his family were okay. We were actually traveling to Bristol listening to his podcasts as this happened. My mom called my wife to tell her.... she was confused as she scrolled her phone and both our hearts dropped until I saw his sister’s Kelley’s tweet. Dodged one today.
 

DUN24

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They were all fortunate today


You can see Amy chasing the dog out as it runs towards the street, someone holding the baby walking next to Dale jr, and then Dale collapsing. Crazy ****.
 
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Clutch

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They were all fortunate today

I wish they'd tell me the make of the phone they took the video with so that I'm sure I never buy one.

That aside how fortunate they all were to survive. Someone said it landed but couldn't stop ....but that looks like it on the side of a road.
 

kkfan91

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I wish they'd tell me the make of the phone they took the video with so that I'm sure I never buy one.

That aside how fortunate they all were to survive. Someone said it landed but couldn't stop ....but that looks like it on the side of a road.
From a different picture angle you can see it crashed through the fence and looks like ended up in a ditch
 

superchuck500

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From a different picture angle you can see it crashed through the fence and looks like ended up in a ditch

Yep. Impact on the uneven ground likely ruptured the fuel tank and a spark ignited it. There’s firewalls in the fuselage to give the ****pit and forward cabin a moment, but that’s a full-on emergency get the ___ out situation, man. Terrifying.
 

Kiante

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I was on the way to work when I received the alert. My heart instantly sunk, but I'm glad everyone is okay. To think of Allison, Kulwicki, and the Hendrick family had such tragedies...

I also, hope they all seek mental counseling as well for this. I could only imagine how traumatic a situation like that is. Jr collapsing is quite scary to see as well, wow.
 
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DanicaFreak

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omg glad everyones ok.

I wonder if he will pull a "madden" and drive everywhere now.
 

sdj

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If I am Jr, I am driving back home after the race:(


That is one way to look at it.

I look at it like this, I would fly and not worry about it, what are the odds of this occurrence twice? JMHO

I relate a statement by Robin Williams in a movie where he was a professor looking at a 2 story house to buy and a small plane crashed into the second story while he was looking at it. He turned to the real estate agent and said, I''ll take it, stating what are the odds of this happening twice.
 

kkfan91

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That is one way to look at it.

I look at it like this, I would fly and not worry about it, what are the odds of this occurrence twice? JMHO

I relate a statement by Robin Williams in a movie where he was a professor looking at a 2 story house to buy and a small plane crashed into the second story while he was looking at it. He turned to the real estate agent and said, I''ll take it, stating what are the odds of this happening twice.
Well my aunt had a nephew who said he would never be struck by lightning because his dad was killed by it...guess how he died.
 

jws926

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That is one way to look at it.

I look at it like this, I would fly and not worry about it, what are the odds of this occurrence twice? JMHO

I relate a statement by Robin Williams in a movie where he was a professor looking at a 2 story house to buy and a small plane crashed into the second story while he was looking at it. He turned to the real estate agent and said, I''ll take it, stating what are the odds of this happening twice.
Honestly, I was trying to interject a bit humor into a ****** situation, who knows how they got home, but they got home safely and thats all that matters right now .
 

spindoc

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That is one way to look at it.

I look at it like this, I would fly and not worry about it, what are the odds of this occurrence twice? JMHO

I relate a statement by Robin Williams in a movie where he was a professor looking at a 2 story house to buy and a small plane crashed into the second story while he was looking at it. He turned to the real estate agent and said, I''ll take it, stating what are the odds of this happening twice.
Just ask “one eyed Jack” about that. He defied the odds and crashed 2 aircraft.
 

JGR_20

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So scary seeing that last video. That plane was erupting into flames before someone even kicked the door open. So thankful all of them made it out. Don’t even want to imagine how frightening that had to be.
 

LewTheShoe

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https://abc7news.com/new-video-shows-dramatic-escape-from-dale-earnhardt-jrs-burning-plane/5474601/

Much better video of the actual escape from the plane. There is obvious mass confusion. One guy is outside, does not approach the burning plane, seems he is afraid of the fire or too much heat. He probably thought there were no survivors.

Then the door opens and one guy climbs out. He turns back toward the door and receives the baby, turns and runs. A second guy comes out, I think it is Dale. He runs also. Amy emerges, trips and falls, the men turn back to help her. The last man and Gus make it out and all run away.

A hellish nightmare of a scene. It was obviously a very close call... they couldn't have had more than a few seconds to spare. Maybe there was less fire and smoke inside, but it looked very dicey to me. And just imagine, if that chain link fencing had covered the door area...
 

Clutch

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https://abc7news.com/new-video-shows-dramatic-escape-from-dale-earnhardt-jrs-burning-plane/5474601/

Much better video of the actual escape from the plane. There is obvious mass confusion. One guy is outside, does not approach the burning plane, seems he is afraid of the fire or too much heat. He probably thought there were no survivors.

Then the door opens and one guy climbs out. He turns back toward the door and receives the baby, turns and runs. A second guy comes out, I think it is Dale. He runs also. Amy emerges, trips and falls, the men turn back to help her. The last man and Gus make it out and all run away.

A hellish nightmare of a scene. It was obviously a very close call... they couldn't have had more than a few seconds to spare. Maybe there was less fire and smoke inside, but it looked very dicey to me. And just imagine, if that chain link fencing had covered the door area...
Wow! Scary alright. So glad it turned out alright.
 

aunty dive

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A guy I know from another site put this up.

Posted without comment:

"I have seen some pilot comments on a site that requires a subscription. There is a consensus that this was pilot error. Most agree with me that the proper action is a go-around on the first bounce, but it should be the first bounce. There is an opinion that even if the landing gear had not collapsed, after the second bounce you are committed because too much speed has been lost to make a successful go-around on a short runway. This makes sense. It is better to crash relatively slowly at the end of the runway from a failed landing than to crash really fast from a failed go-around.

Now for the speculation that most likely will be addressed when the preliminary report comes out later this week. There is an opinion that professional pilots are better than this, and it was Junior himself flying the plane. If this was an “instructional” flight, then the passengers become an issue, and it is still an error by the instructional pilot-in-command for not taking immediate action to go around. It is simple to do: The guy yells out “go around” or “my plane” and firewalls the throttles by placing his hands on top of Junior’s which would already be on the throttles."
 

Johali

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A guy I know from another site put this up.

Posted without comment:

"I have seen some pilot comments on a site that requires a subscription. There is a consensus that this was pilot error. Most agree with me that the proper action is a go-around on the first bounce, but it should be the first bounce. There is an opinion that even if the landing gear had not collapsed, after the second bounce you are committed because too much speed has been lost to make a successful go-around on a short runway. This makes sense. It is better to crash relatively slowly at the end of the runway from a failed landing than to crash really fast from a failed go-around.

Now for the speculation that most likely will be addressed when the preliminary report comes out later this week. There is an opinion that professional pilots are better than this, and it was Junior himself flying the plane. If this was an “instructional” flight, then the passengers become an issue, and it is still an error by the instructional pilot-in-command for not taking immediate action to go around. It is simple to do: The guy yells out “go around” or “my plane” and firewalls the throttles by placing his hands on top of Junior’s which would already be on the throttles."
I'll wait for the official results. Guessing and slander is not my thing.
 

StandOnIt

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I watch this guy a lot. He's a commercial pilot. It's dry, lots of technical information, no conclusions. one thing of note the runway was tight on landing distance

 
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Spotter22

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A guy I know from another site put this up.

Posted without comment:

"I have seen some pilot comments on a site that requires a subscription. There is a consensus that this was pilot error. Most agree with me that the proper action is a go-around on the first bounce, but it should be the first bounce. There is an opinion that even if the landing gear had not collapsed, after the second bounce you are committed because too much speed has been lost to make a successful go-around on a short runway. This makes sense. It is better to crash relatively slowly at the end of the runway from a failed landing than to crash really fast from a failed go-around.

Now for the speculation that most likely will be addressed when the preliminary report comes out later this week. There is an opinion that professional pilots are better than this, and it was Junior himself flying the plane. If this was an “instructional” flight, then the passengers become an issue, and it is still an error by the instructional pilot-in-command for not taking immediate action to go around. It is simple to do: The guy yells out “go around” or “my plane” and firewalls the throttles by placing his hands on top of Junior’s which would already be on the throttles."
I think Jr might have done a instruct if his family wasnt on board, doubt he would take that chance.
 

Pat

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I'll wait for the official results. Guessing and slander is not my thing.

I'll wait. This is garbage. I know a little about flight instruction and obtaining a license. No passengers are allowed until you are licensed. Furthermore, you have to have a certain amount of hours under your belt, in that type plane, before you are allowed passengers.
 

DanicaFreak

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I know a few things about flying and instruction and @Pat is 150% right.
but like others I will wait till I see the official report.
 
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DUN24

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I think Jr might have done a instruct if his family wasnt on board, doubt he would take that chance.

He just had Clyde on his podcast a few weeks ago. They talked about flying and Dale was basically like "That's all you bud, I'll leave it to my pilots".


Who knows at this point though
 

LewTheShoe

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It's the internet, so wild speculation stated as fact is obligatory. Meanwhile, the official preliminary report establishes who was piloting, who was co-piloting, and what their credentials are.

The crucial fact is that the pilot attempted a go-around after the second bounce, but "the airplane did not respond as expected, so they landed straight-ahead on the runway and could not stop the airplane prior to the excursion."

On August 15, 2019, about 1537 eastern daylight time, a Textron Aviation Inc. 680A, N8JR, was destroyed during a runway excursion after landing at Elizabethton Municipal Airport (0A9), Elizabethton, Tennessee. The airline transport-rated pilot and copilot were not injured. The three passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to JRM Air LLC and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight originated at Statesville Regional Airport (SVH), Statesville, North Carolina at 1519 and was destined for 0A9.

According to the flight crew, the flight departed SVH under visual flight rules and climbed to 12,500 ft. No air traffic control services were requested. The preflight, departure, and en route portions of the flight were routine. Approaching 0A9, the crew announced their intentions to land on runway 24 via the airport's common traffic advisory frequency.

Airport surveillance video captured the initial touchdown, which occurred near the runway touchdown zone, and portions of the accident sequence. The airplane bounced twice, then continued airborne down runway 24 until it touched down a third time with about 1,000 ft of paved surface remaining. The video revealed that the right main landing gear collapsed and the outboard section of the right wing contacted the runway shortly after the third touchdown. The airplane departed the paved surface beyond the runway 24 departure end threshold, through an open area of grass, down an embankment, through a chain-link fence, and up an embankment, coming to rest on the edge of Tennessee Highway 91.

The pilots' account of the landing was generally consistent with the video. The pilots also reported that, following the second bounce, a go-around was attempted; however, the airplane did not respond as expected, so they landed straight-ahead on the runway and could not stop the airplane prior to the excursion. After the airplane came to a stop, the flight crew secured the engines and assisted the passengers with the evacuation. The main entry door was utilized to exit the airplane. A postaccident fire was in progress during the evacuation.

The airplane came to rest upright, on a true heading of 285º. The fuselage aft of the main entry door, the right wing, and the empennage were consumed by the postaccident fire. The left main and nose landing gear were separated from the airframe during the impact sequence. The right main landing gear remained under the right wing and was heavily fire damaged.

The airplane, also known as the Citation Latitude, was a low wing, cruciform tail design with twin, fuselage-mounted Pratt and Whitney Canada 360D turbofan engines. It was equipped with two ****pit seats and nine passenger seats. The airplane was built in 2015 and the owner purchased the airplane new. The total time of the airframe was about 1,165 hours. The maximum takeoff weight was 31,025 lbs. The ****pit, which was undamaged by fire, was equipped with a Garmin G5000 advanced integrated flight deck (flat screen displays and touch screen controls) that recorded numerous flight and systems parameters. The data was successfully downloaded following the accident. The airplane was also equipped with a ****pit voice recorder (CVR). The CVR was damaged by the postaccident fire and was sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, DC for examination and download.

The pilot, seated in the left ****pit seat and acting as the flying pilot and pilot-in-command, held an airline transport pilot certificate and a type rating in the accident airplane. He reported 5,800 hours total flight experience, including 765 hours in the accident airplane. His latest recurrent training occurred in October 2018.

The copilot, seated in the right ****pit seat, held an airline transport pilot certificate and a type rating in the accident airplane. He reported 11,000 hours total flight experience, including 1,165 hours in the accident airplane. His latest recurrent training occurred in October 2018.

The reported weather at 0A9 at 1535 included calm wind, 10 miles visibility, scattered clouds at 4,700 and 5,500 ft, broken clouds at 7,000 ft, and altimeter setting 29.97 inches of mercury.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

https://app.ntsb.gov/pdfgenerator/R...tID=20190815X74831&AKey=1&RType=HTML&IType=FA
 
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