'21 Generation 7 Car news

Dr_B_UNC

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If they are only going to have one brake package, where does it fall in line with the ones being used now? If a plate racing package is a 2, and Michigan package is a 4 and a Watkins Glen package is a 6 and Martinsville is an 8, where does this one fit in?
I've always operated under the assumption that the increase in size is over the previous package that is the largest to fit within the rims, which is Martinsville. Are we really going on for a page and a half about something so asinine?
 

Charlie Spencer

Road courses and short tracks.
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I've always operated under the assumption that the increase in size is over the previous package that is the largest to fit within the rims, which is Martinsville. Are we really going on for a page and a half about something so asinine?
Would you rather we talk about DiBenedetto some more?
 

Revman

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What? I’m not sure how you came to that conclusion from my reply. The new car will offer new challenges at all tracks, and I pointed out Martinsville because you referenced it first. Regardless, the best drivers and teams will get the most speed out of the car as they adapt to the new handling.
I understand that, but because the car should handle so much better, I wonder if it will take far less to be good.....We have already travelled down that path with brake technology and SMT. If you take the insanity of wheeling the beast we currently have around that little track out of the equation in favor of a more nimble car, what might the racing look like? I think the Roval test showed that Next Gen will be massively faster on road courses.....wondering how it will be at Martinsville. How might the track drive differently?
 

Revman

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As far as Martinsville, theoretically, the independent rear suspension should allow the the car to rotate better in the center and get the power down better coming off the corner. On the other hand, if the brake packages are as limited as I have been led to believe, then that will put a real premium on backing up the corner and will penalize drivers that like to drive it in deep. NASCAR missed a real opportunity to take some weight out of these cars, so they will still punish the brakes if you aren't real careful. If they truly are brake limited, look for the good road course drivers to dominate. One wonders if we might actually see down shifting to help slow the car at some point.
Thank you! This is the content I came here for as they say. I appreciate this. I love the new car, and I am excited to see how it changes everything.
 

ChexOrWrex

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I understand that, but because the car should handle so much better, I wonder if it will take far less to be good.....We have already travelled down that path with brake technology and SMT. If you take the insanity of wheeling the beast we currently have around that little track out of the equation in favor of a more nimble car, what might the racing look like? I think the Roval test showed that Next Gen will be massively faster on road courses.....wondering how it will be at Martinsville. How might the track drive differently?
I think you are confusing “easier” with “different”. Since the brakes are bigger, I anticipate braking zones to be further down the straights, which means speeds getting into and through the corners will be faster. Conquering the new handling is a new challenge that I don’t think is necessarily “easier”.

For instance, college footballs are “easier” to throw because they are a little smaller than NFL balls. The player still has to throw the ball accurately to make a play, no matter what size the football is.
 

aunty dive

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"The 18-inch wheel also opens the door for bigger brakes, measuring 15.0 inches in the front and 14.0 inches in the rear, up from current 12.7-inch rotors at the front and rear. There will be two rotors to choose from, both having the same diameters but different thicknesses. A narrower rotor will be used for high-speed ovals, while a thicker rotor will be tasked to manage the higher thermal loads of short tracks and road courses. The clamping forces will be provided by a six-piston caliper in the front and a four-piston out back."

 

Hawaii808

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To expand on the rotor size discussion, on dirtbikes for years 260mm was the standard front rotor size. Somebody came up with 280mm kit. Only problem with 280 is better chance of bending it hitting ruts or rocks.
The 280 would put you on your lid several times until you got used to it. Allowed much less aggressive pads. HUGE difference! No caliper change. It worked. Same pushrod too.
Same thing happened with mountain bikes. When 8" rotors came out EVERY downhill rig got them. I even ran 8" rotors on my 24" rear wheel. Huge difference.
 

Kiante

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I think Dale is starting to get the itch again:
I think he's liking the car, so far. Still feels he needs more running to really guage where the NextGen is.
 

ChexOrWrex

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Clint Bowyer: theres not much room out there lemme tell ya

Dale Jr: theres gonna be plenty of room
 

Nitro Dude

Hauler Driver and Cylinder Head Maintenance
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I bet the tickets are going fast for the LA race. I had better purchase one ASAP before they are all gone. Bobby, have you checked on them yet?
 
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