'21 Generation 7 Car news

Formerjackman

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One of the things I find curious is that in the current car video, even at this low speed there seems to be a significant alteration of the rear suspension geometry, an actual wreck like Bowman's there didn't seem to be any serious suspension damage at all. Someone who has had some involvement in this whole situation (don't remember who) stated that while NASCAR can certainly improve the car, as long as it has this type of design it will never attain numbers even as good as the old car.
 

StandOnIt

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One of the things I find curious is that in the current car video, even at this low speed there seems to be a significant alteration of the rear suspension geometry, an actual wreck like Bowman's there didn't seem to be any serious suspension damage at all. Someone who has had some involvement in this whole situation (don't remember who) stated that while NASCAR can certainly improve the car, as long as it has this type of design it will never attain numbers even as good as the old car.
Heard that from a friend of a friend did ya?
 

Formerjackman

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Heard that from a friend of a friend did ya?

No, I heard it discussed on one of the podcasts, can't remember which one, but it was from either a driver or a crew chief who had seen the testing data. It MAY just be an opinion, but I can certainly see the point. I don't see ANY WAY the back of the new car ever has the level of crushability the old car had, and I haven't seen NASCAR put out any data from the old car, which tells me they would rather not talk about it. If they had ANYTHING that demonstrated that the new car version 1.0 or 2.0 was anywhere close to the old car, they would be shouting it from the rooftops.
 

KTMLew01

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No, I heard it discussed on one of the podcasts, can't remember which one, but it was from either a driver or a crew chief who had seen the testing data. It MAY just be an opinion, but I can certainly see the point. I don't see ANY WAY the back of the new car ever has the level of crushability the old car had, and I haven't seen NASCAR put out any data from the old car, which tells me they would rather not talk about it. If they had ANYTHING that demonstrated that the new car version 1.0 or 2.0 was anywhere close to the old car, they would be shouting it from the rooftops.
Have to move fuel cell inside the car like the Strailians have done.
 

StandOnIt

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No, I heard it discussed on one of the podcasts, can't remember which one, but it was from either a driver or a crew chief who had seen the testing data. It MAY just be an opinion, but I can certainly see the point. I don't see ANY WAY the back of the new car ever has the level of crushability the old car had, and I haven't seen NASCAR put out any data from the old car, which tells me they would rather not talk about it. If they had ANYTHING that demonstrated that the new car version 1.0 or 2.0 was anywhere close to the old car, they would be shouting it from the rooftops.
Oh I see, conspiracy theory, Can't remember where it was heard or who said it.
 

wi_racefan

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Have to move fuel cell inside the car like the Strailians have done.
Isn't the issue is they need the rear stiff enough to keep the transaxle from puncturing the fuel cell? I don't know crap about transaxles, but I thought this was discussed earlier?

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Formerjackman

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Oh I see, conspiracy theory, Can't remember where it was heard or who said it.
I listen to about 10 different podcasts a week, many of them with people coming in and out of my office, and sometimes with a land line phone in one ear and a cell phone in the other. Pardon me if I can't cite chapter and verse for every single statement or opinion I hear over the course of a week.
 

KTMLew01

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Isn't the issue is they need the rear stiff enough to keep the transaxle from puncturing the fuel cell? I don't know crap about transaxles, but I thought this was discussed earlier?

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The Australian Supercars use similar transaxle setup. They found the need to move the fuel cell INSIDE the car. Seems the safest place for it? Just like every modern car on the highway now has it under the back seat instead of in or just forward of the trunk Allows vehicle to crush all the way to back window. The old cars had chassis frame & bracing angles that allowed the rear clip to deflect down and not so much forward. Seems to have worked most of the time.
 

Spotter22

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The Australian Supercars use similar transaxle setup. They found the need to move the fuel cell INSIDE the car. Seems the safest place for it? Just like every modern car on the highway now has it under the back seat instead of in or just forward of the trunk Allows vehicle to crush all the way to back window. The old cars had chassis frame & bracing angles that allowed the rear clip to deflect down and not so much forward. Seems to have worked most of the time.
Changes have already been determined and will be done following the last race. We havent had one issue of fire due to fuel cell eruption all year.
 

Magicmiler

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The Australian Supercars use similar transaxle setup. They found the need to move the fuel cell INSIDE the car. Seems the safest place for it? Just like every modern car on the highway now has it under the back seat instead of in or just forward of the trunk Allows vehicle to crush all the way to back window. The old cars had chassis frame & bracing angles that allowed the rear clip to deflect down and not so much forward. Seems to have worked most of the time.
That 'ol 60s Chevy truck I had made me nervous. Fuel tank right behind my back, always smoked cigarettes outside the cab...
 

Formerjackman

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That 'ol 60s Chevy truck I had made me nervous. Fuel tank right behind my back, always smoked cigarettes outside the cab...
I drove those trucks for years, had a 69 and a 71. The 71 got so rusty the cab mounts rotted until the fuel tank was sitting on the pointed left rear cab mount bolt, which proceeded to slowly drill a hole in the tank. Had to have it soldered shut, then trim the bolt head and put a pieces of mudflap between the cab floor and the tank.
 

KTMLew01

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Construction of replacement rear clips is underway at the supplier’s facility. Some have already been shipped.
Seems like fairly minor changes to me. Makes you wonder why this didn't get started sooner. Or maybe it took 4-5-6 months to get the jigs built? (I'd certainly hope not/Infinity teams could "update" one of these inside a week for first one & then have the jig ready to modify half-dozen week after)
 

aunty dive

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They started after the most recent (last month) crash test/ analysis.

Most of it is tubing removal with some small changes/additions. I will guess that the jigs they already have are being used with minor changes.
 

KTMLew01

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They started after the most recent (last month) crash test/ analysis.

Most of it is tubing removal with some small changes/additions. I will guess that the jigs they already have are being used with minor changes.
Agree 100%. Typed some more but it's pointless.
 

KTMLew01

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And for those that don't understand post #6097, want to say the teams fired all the fabricators...who is building the Infinity & Truck chassis?
 

Formerjackman

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Well and fine, but more effort two years ago would have resulted in less to do now. Nothing they are trying to fix now is some mystery of the universe.
 

StandOnIt

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Well and fine, but more effort two years ago would have resulted in less to do now. Nothing they are trying to fix now is some mystery of the universe.
They are going to be continually revising the car until they go to another generation of the car. Surely you should know that instead of these weak should a could a 20 20 hindsight simpleton whines
 

aunty dive

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There won’t be as much dirty air at Marstinville.

So that’s a relief. Hurry up, Elon.
 

LewTheShoe

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Well and fine, but more effort two years ago would have resulted in less to do now. Nothing they are trying to fix now is some mystery of the universe.
That's a really cheap shot right there, considering the COVID disruptions that affected the development cycle on the Next Gen car. The introduction was delayed just one year, but the development cycle was set back by a lot more than 12 months. Nobody wanted to delay the car a second year, for many compelling reasons.

Even without COVID, I don't think anyone *except you* expected the new car to roll out and not get any revisions for multiple years because it's friggin' perfect on day one. Just in the last several days, you've whined about (a) cost of changes to the rear crush zones, (b) changes to the nose piece and hood, and now (c) considering aero mods for short tracks. What's next to complain about?
 

acmerocket

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hope they let someone that knows about racecars design and build it,not clowns and the lowest bidder.:owquitit:
 
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