'21 Generation 7 Car news

wi_racefan

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Nothing against Cole but I wonder why they chose him as the SHR driver to test the car. To me the no brainers is Kevin. You would think he'd provide a lot better feedback and be able to help more with changes

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Old Kid

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Nothing against Cole but I wonder why they chose him as the SHR driver to test the car. To me the no brainers is Kevin. You would think he'd provide a lot better feedback and be able to help more with changes

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I thinks it's interesting and can only assume they want input from drivers of various experience levels. That being said I think Cole is exceptionally sharp for his experience level. With an entire year now added until it debuts, I think a good number of drivers will get a shot at it. I hope that's the case.
 

StandOnIt

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I think Nascar has more concerns with durability and handling of the car using Dover, than any driver they pick
 

Team Penske

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Nothing against Cole but I wonder why they chose him as the SHR driver to test the car. To me the no brainers is Kevin. You would think he'd provide a lot better feedback and be able to help more with changes

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Setting up the car for any driver is the goal NOT for the best driver. This test in part is about adjustments.
 

StandOnIt

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NASCAR completes Next Gen test at Dover
John Probst on new components in the car for Dover
This is the same car we’ve had at previous tests, the biggest difference is probably the driveline. We now have all production-intent parts and pieces for the driveline, from the clutch shaft to the axles. So that is a really big reason for us to put as many miles on it as we can.


John Probst on the Next Gen timeline
Right now, the most important part of the project is getting all of the OEM bodies approved by the end of September. That is a really big milestone for us, and we’re on track to hit it. In terms of on-track testing, we still want to get to a superspeedway, and we’re looking at something at Daytona after the season ends. There is also significant enough interest that we may look into doing other on-track tests.

 

ChexOrWrex

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yeah they are doing all of this testing on a car that won't be anything like what they will race with :sarcasm:
The testing is being done on the suspension, chassis, and components that aren’t seen. This has already been reported.
 

KTMLew01

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The testing is being done on the suspension, chassis, and components that aren’t seen. This has already been reported.
We live in a world of fake news. Nobody believes anything. Even facts plainly stated must be a conspiracy. Kevin Harvick has lost a step. Or two.
 

StandOnIt

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The testing is being done on the suspension, chassis, and components that aren’t seen. This has already been reported.
I would guess that would make sense if a person was looking for an exact copy of the test body. But there won't be much difference to what they are testing.
 

ChexOrWrex

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I would guess that would make sense if a person was looking for an exact copy of the test body. But there won't be much difference to what they are testing.
The body on the car now has zero manufacturer identity, it’s simply a placeholder for testing. What they are testing now is mainly aero under the car. Manufacturers are still designing what the body will look like.

 

gnomesayin

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According to Probst, NASCAR is leaving the manufacturers room on less "aerodynamically sensitive" areas of the car to differentiate and style. Since those are few and far between, it is going to be a pretty tight box they are working in. NASCAR isn't planning to do a bunch of BoP adjustments after the fact between manufacturers. I think anyone expecting major body differences from make to make will be disappointed.
 

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“As much as we like that we’ve been able to make our new car look like a Mustang, we’d like the ability to do even more in that area,” said Ford Peformance director Mark Rushbrook.“In terms of what you see on the outside of the car, we’d like to see a few changes underneath the car for a little bit of technical relevance


IRS, rack and pinion steering, and a transaxle..Yeah I think they made a few changes The current test car doesn't have flat sides in the rear quarters but is similar to the street cars Camaro and Mustang. The car will be symmetrical. The body is going to be similar to what they have in the test car, a bit different front and rear end, basic shape will be the same.
 

StandOnIt

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According to Probst, NASCAR is leaving the manufacturers room on less "aerodynamically sensitive" areas of the car to differentiate and style. Since those are few and far between, it is going to be a pretty tight box they are working in. NASCAR isn't planning to do a bunch of BoP adjustments after the fact between manufacturers. I think anyone expecting major body differences from make to make will be disappointed.
yeah I'm not looking for a four door Camry, and they aren't spending all the bucks to do tests with a car that isn't really close to what they are going to race. Doesn't make any sense. No telling how much time those test cars have spent in the wind tunnel
 

ChexOrWrex

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According to Probst, NASCAR is leaving the manufacturers room on less "aerodynamically sensitive" areas of the car to differentiate and style. Since those are few and far between, it is going to be a pretty tight box they are working in. NASCAR isn't planning to do a bunch of BoP adjustments after the fact between manufacturers. I think anyone expecting major body differences from make to make will be disappointed.
NASCAR always keeps the manufactures and teams in a tight box, but the manufacturers have already said they are not at all interested in spec cars.

The first test at Richmond was with a generic body that simply meets the aero requirements from NASCAR and from the looks of it, that same body style has been tested everywhere else. It is nowhere near OEM specific, and the OEMs want something that looks more like the street cars.




I’m not expecting some radical design that is spitting image of their street counterparts, but I do expect the manufacturers to give the body more brand identity than the cars do now - which is just the shape of the nose.
 

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Scary read, if you ask me. I don't know anything about Bozi Tatarevic, but some of his comments in there are pretty worrisome about how the Next Gen car will drive, how it will actually race... twitchy steering, unpredictable aero effects on handling, etc. Just my $0,02.
From what I know, he's a general automotive technical writer who has emerged as a popular social media "explainer" of various mechanical concepts, both in racing and street cars.

Many of his comments here are disappointing. Particularly to me his claim that the current form of the prototype is no lighter and possibly even heavier than the previous car. Some of his conclusions feel preliminary and crude to me, particularly the idea that pack racing would result from overly cautious drivers afraid to push the car. I see little basis to believe that is how NASCAR drivers operate at any level. However, I share some of his concerns from what little is currently known. It now seems fortunate that they have an additional year to work on it.
 

aunty dive

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The test mule is already turning competitive times and teams haven’t gotten their hands on it yet. When they do, the new cars will outperform what we have now, especially on road and roval courses.

The technical writer’s steering system remarks don’t make sense. Rack and pinion steering is far superior to the pickup truck stuff currently in use. Much more direct in its responses to driver inputs. If it’s too “twitchy” either adjust the power steering pump’s pressure relief valve down or hire Kyle Larson.
 
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StandOnIt

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I know a hatchet job when I read it. I don't know how he came up with his "twitchy steering" statement from what Dillion said: “I had a blast driving it". or LaJoie relaying that Dillon expressed the car “drives like a race car should.” and come up with twitchy steering? I know I do and I think many Nascar fans don't want to see a car that is easier to drive. Taking away the flat sides is going to make it harder to drive on ovals without those sides to lean on. Nascar has done a lot of work to make the current car as passable as possible considering the speeds they run. I don't think they are letting up with the new car.
 

ChexOrWrex

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I know a hatchet job when I read it. I don't know how he came up with his "twitchy steering" statement from what Dillion said: “I had a blast driving it". or LaJoie relaying that Dillon expressed the car “drives like a race car should.” and come up with twitchy steering? I know I do and I think many Nascar fans don't want to see a car that is easier to drive. Taking away the flat sides is going to make it harder to drive on ovals without those sides to lean on. Nascar has done a lot of work to make the current car as passable as possible considering the speeds they run. I don't think they are letting up with the new car.
Feedback from early tests of the gen 7 car came back that the new steering was twitchy, and NASCAR made adjustments from said feedback.
 

StandOnIt

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Feedback from early tests of the gen 7 car came back that the new steering was twitchy, and NASCAR made adjustments from said feedback.
nope, it is a guess by the article author from hearsay.

but based on what I've heard and seen of the system it was very haphazard at the time and actually quite twitchy so they had go back and work on improving it.
 

Turtle84

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quote from Custer "I think in clean air you can go mid to high 23. I feel like we’re close and there’s a lot of differences in how the car travels. There’s a lot more travel in the car. It’s a lot higher up on the straightaways. It’s just trying to control that and figure out the best way to go about that.”

More travel and being higher up, is a good sign in how the car will ultimately drive, imo.
 

ChexOrWrex

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nope, it is a guess by the article author from hearsay.

but based on what I've heard and seen of the system it was very haphazard at the time and actually quite twitchy so they had go back and work on improving it.

“One such aspect is the steering. which is a new rack-and-pinion system that is different from the recirculating-ball system in use on the current generation of Cup cars. Our sources state that feedback from early tests indicated that the steering was “twitchy.” NASCAR has made adjustments to try to stabilize it. Offsets appear to have slightly changed for the wheels, based on the photos released and according to a source. The goal there was to make scrub radius adjustments in order to provide less sensitive steering.”
 

FLRacingFan

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Scary read, if you ask me. I don't know anything about Bozi Tatarevic, but some of his comments in there are pretty worrisome about how the Next Gen car will drive, how it will actually race... twitchy steering, unpredictable aero effects on handling, etc. Just my $0,02.
In addition what gnome said he’s also a mechanic for an IMSA team so I believe he has some NASCAR contacts, which he’s gleaned info from for various columns before.
 

FLRacingFan

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From what I know, he's a general automotive technical writer who has emerged as a popular social media "explainer" of various mechanical concepts, both in racing and street cars.

Many of his comments here are disappointing. Particularly to me his claim that the current form of the prototype is no lighter and possibly even heavier than the previous car. Some of his conclusions feel preliminary and crude to me, particularly the idea that pack racing would result from overly cautious drivers afraid to push the car. I see little basis to believe that is how NASCAR drivers operate at any level. However, I share some of his concerns from what little is currently known. It now seems fortunate that they have an additional year to work on it.
The heavier car bit was surprising to me too, but I guess that could be down to things like bigger wheels?
 

aunty dive

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The heavier car bit was surprising to me too, but I guess that could be down to things like bigger wheels?
From the V8 Supercar rules:

"The minimum weight of each car is 1,395 kilograms (3,075 lb) including the driver, with a minimum load of 755 kg over the front axle. The minimum weight for the driver is 100 kg and includes the driver dressed in a full racing suit, the seat and seat mountings and any ballast needed to meet the minimum weight."

100kg = 220 pounds.

The new wheel and tire combo should be lighter ... the wheels are aluminum rather than steel and the tire's sidewalls are "shorter". The extra width of the tire might equalize that.
 
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