'21 Generation 7 Car news

Mispeedway15

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Ratios for 4th, 5th and 6th gears in the transaxle will be closely spaced. Ideal for road circuits.

I wonder if we’ll see gear changes on some of the other track configurations? In addition to the usual suspect(s), I think it would be handy at Loudon. Anywhere else?
Do you think this would lead to shifting in turns like what Indycar does?
 

Formerjackman

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Like one of the posters in the link, I was quite confused when I saw this. First off, it is my understanding that the Camaro is longer even being imported into Australia, AND, there has been no confirmation that the Camaro will even exist beyond 2023-2024, which also calls into question what GM is going to do about NASCAR. They are quickly running out of cars that could even be remotely considered eligible for NASCAR.
 

gnomesayin

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I'm agnostic about the wing, but otherwise, the Supercars designs are superior and accomplish what Next Gen purports to be about to a greater degree than what NASCAR has shown. The cars never really resemble Mustangs and Camaros until you lose the four door sedan-ish greenhouse and wheelbase.


The quest for better racing includes a targeted aerodynamic downforce reduction of more than 50 percent from current levels, around which a new Dunlop control tyre is being developed.

Gen3 will require that all race cars have the same dimensions as the road cars they are based on for all key body components, such as doors, roof, windows and bonnet.
 

ChexOrWrex

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I'm agnostic about the wing, but otherwise, the Supercars designs are superior and accomplish what Next Gen purports to be about to a greater degree than what NASCAR has shown. The cars never really resemble Mustangs and Camaros until you lose the four door sedan-ish greenhouse and wheelbase.

I can only get so erect.
 

Charlie Spencer

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I'm agnostic about the wing, but otherwise, the Supercars designs are superior and accomplish what Next Gen purports to be about to a greater degree than what NASCAR has shown. The cars never really resemble Mustangs and Camaros until you lose the four door sedan-ish greenhouse and wheelbase.

I am pleasantly surprised to find I can easily see the differences between these two cars.

Also, in the pursuit of better racing, Goodyear should begin making racing tyres.
 

StandOnIt

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Those look great, but comparing 100% road racing cars to cars that will race on a variety of tracks from super speedway to dirt is a recipe for disappointment for many probably. I don't see anything superior in fact it is much easier to design a race car for one type of track than for road, oval, and dirt. Compromises will be made, one size will have to fit all.
 

NASCAR Apologist

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I'm agnostic about the wing, but otherwise, the Supercars designs are superior and accomplish what Next Gen purports to be about to a greater degree than what NASCAR has shown. The cars never really resemble Mustangs and Camaros until you lose the four door sedan-ish greenhouse and wheelbase.

The wheelbase between the two series shouldn’t be more than an inch or two apart. And how do you achieve aerodynamic parity with road body dimensions at higher speeds and more sustained speed than touring cars? It must have been much easier for them to lower the roll cage too.
 

gnomesayin

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And how do you achieve aerodynamic parity with road body dimensions at higher speeds and more sustained speed than touring cars? It must have been much easier for them to lower the roll cage too.

I agree, it is a greater challenge with high speed ovals. With all of the emphasis on road relevance, I'm stating the obvious cosmetically. I don't think I would favor NASCAR mandating literal street model dimensions and then doing BOP. However, the common template could go further to emulate the silhouettes of the sports cars / coupes that the manufacturers have moved toward.
 

Conover

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I think NASCAR may live to regret the dirt experiment next season but who knows. These cars aren't going to easily be dialed into that sort of environment. Plus one little spin episode will wreck a ton of equipment. I presume they will still not have the more forgiving body next season.
 

Conover

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However, the common template could go further to emulate the silhouettes of the sports cars / coupes that the manufacturers have moved toward.

INDEED! Next gen needs to make the bodies as visually and effectively similar to street versions as possible.
 

StandOnIt

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I think NASCAR may live to regret the dirt experiment next season but who knows. These cars aren't going to easily be dialed into that sort of environment. Plus one little spin episode will wreck a ton of equipment. I presume they will still not have the more forgiving body next season.
The body will weigh around 200 pounds and be made out of carbon fiber very similar to the Xfinity cars.
 

FLRacingFan

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Like one of the posters in the link, I was quite confused when I saw this. First off, it is my understanding that the Camaro is longer even being imported into Australia, AND, there has been no confirmation that the Camaro will even exist beyond 2023-2024, which also calls into question what GM is going to do about NASCAR. They are quickly running out of cars that could even be remotely considered eligible for NASCAR.
It's likely just marketing for GM Specialty Vehicles, as they obviously can't build a C8 race model around that control chassis. What's been reported is that Supercars, in a deal with GM, holds the IP rights to a Camaro race car and are tasking Triple Eight with developing and building the cars. There is very little, if any, actual GM involvement here. The FG X Falcon was also raced by Ford teams for two years after local production ended so a similar situation could play out with the Camaro, putting them on the grid for at least four years.
 

StandOnIt

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Looks good on paper according to Stewart

Q: HOW WILL THE CHANGEOVER BE FOR THE DRIVERS AND TEAMS FINANCIALLY WITH THE MOVE TO THE NEXT GEN CAR?


Tony Stewart: “Financially, it shows on paper that it’s gonna be a huge improvement for all the teams, especially the bottom third of the field. It’s a great opportunity for them to be able to be more competitive with the top third tier teams, so I think all in all that’s gonna be a great thing.


“Getting Chase in a car this year. Getting him used to his team. Getting him used to the drivers, the tracks in a Cup car, I think, is a valuable learning year even though you’re gonna be switching to a different car the next year. I think having him get that experience this year with that group will even make year two and getting into that new car put him on a more level playing field with everybody once he’s got that first year under his belt.


“Everybody is gonna have to start kind of from scratch when the new car comes out, but financially it’s good for the sport and good for the teams and for Chase I think getting this year is a gonna be valuable for him before he gets in that car.”

 

Ford 222

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Forgive me for not going through 40 pages if it’s addressed earlier but has anything been said about the engine? Is it one package or does each manufacturer get to build their own? I listened to Moody the other day and he says 2022 will be the time for another manufacturer to jump in since all the development will be done and the cars will be so similar?
 

KTMLew01

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Forgive me for not going through 40 pages if it’s addressed earlier but has anything been said about the engine? Is it one package or does each manufacturer get to build their own? I listened to Moody the other day and he says 2022 will be the time for another manufacturer to jump in since all the development will be done and the cars will be so similar?
Don't believe there will be any engine changes before 2024.
 

Mispeedway15

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Any idea what the plan in 2024 is? One provider?

I doubt that ever happens. Single source parts make sense, we basically have that in all cars on the road today. A lot of my work at Honda was sourcing and it dealt with just that. But the engine? That's the heart of the car. No way it goes to one provider at the highest level.

Truthfully though the biggest challenge is still how to make clean air less of an advantage. I don't care what aerodynamic downforce design a vehicle has, clean air has been dominant for years now to an absurd degree.
 

Revman

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"There aren’t a lot of drivers in it, but there’s a reason there’s not a lot of drivers in it because they put that focus on that small group of race car drivers versus one of the other OEMs out there that is, in my opinion, ruining other drivers’ careers on a daily basis by just signing mass numbers of drivers and then at the end of it they don’t have anywhere to go with them or they decide they don’t like them and then those drivers, and most of them are young drivers, lose opportunities that they could have had along the way to go somewhere else." --Tony Stewart.....Loved Smoke's take on Toyota when he was Chevy loyal, but after whorring himself up by going to Ford, this really pisses me off. Yeah, you could make the case that Toyota has limited room, but you could also make the case that Ford never gives a bunch of prospects a shot, thereby ruining their careers before they ever begin. Having said all of that, I love manufacturer loyalty, and I don't mind when the drivers/owners spit venom from that loyalty.
 

Dr_B_UNC

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Guess they couldn't get the champ and road course ace scheduled to see what it could really do. ;)
Getting Truex and Chase out there on the Roval in them together would give them excellent data.
 

StandOnIt

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It would be interesting if we would get more information on what exactly they are testing for. I really don't see the point about the hush hush nature of the testing this is a generic car.
 

Ford 222

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I doubt that ever happens. Single source parts make sense, we basically have that in all cars on the road today. A lot of my work at Honda was sourcing and it dealt with just that. But the engine? That's the heart of the car. No way it goes to one provider at the highest level.

Truthfully though the biggest challenge is still how to make clean air less of an advantage. I don't care what aerodynamic downforce design a vehicle has, clean air has been dominant for years now to an absurd degree.
The trucks are all powered by Chevrolet, at least that's what Moody said earlier in the year to one of his listeners that indicated he didn't like it. Moody blasted him saying it wasn't a big deal since it wasn't anything you could see.

Complete BS to me. What the hell can a MFG take pride in if NOTHING about the car is Chevy/Yoda/Ford? Completely cheapened the truck series to me.
 
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