'21 Generation 7 Car news

LewTheShoe

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I'm a hater of NASCAR's current NA18D package for intermediate tracks, and have been since it was first previewed in May 2018. On short tracks and road courses, the current 750 horse package with low downforce produces good racing, IMO.

I'll take a wait-and-see attitude toward the 2022 on-track racing product, but my pessimism is growing. I'm all about the races being a stern contest of driving skill. The higher the degree of difficulty, the better I like it. And that means the cars need to be beasts with more power than tire, so the drivers have to brake for corners and then fight for traction at corner exit.

Next year at short tracks and road courses, we'll have substantial gains in mechanical grip due to independent rear suspension and wider tires... and combine that with slashing horsepower from 750 down to 670. So with more mechanical grip and less power, we'll have a low degree of difficulty *unless* we get very hard tires with low grip and/or very low aerodynamic downforce. And I don't see either of those happening, frankly. So for short tracks and road courses, I expect the degree of difficulty to get watered down versus what we have in 2021.

For intermediate tracks, the 550 horse motors and big spoilers will return. We'll still have improved mechanical grip due to IRS and wider tires. I don't see where the hoped-for return of off-throttle time would come from. Like I said, I'll wait to see some races, but not optimistic for a return to NASCAR races being a driver-skill meritocracy. Just my (preliminary) opinion. What do y'all expect?
 

KTMLew01

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I'm a hater of NASCAR's current NA18D package for intermediate tracks, and have been since it was first previewed in May 2018. On short tracks and road courses, the current 750 horse package with low downforce produces good racing, IMO.

I'll take a wait-and-see attitude toward the 2022 on-track racing product, but my pessimism is growing. I'm all about the races being a stern contest of driving skill. The higher the degree of difficulty, the better I like it. And that means the cars need to be beasts with more power than tire, so the drivers have to brake for corners and then fight for traction at corner exit.

Next year at short tracks and road courses, we'll have substantial gains in mechanical grip due to independent rear suspension and wider tires... and combine that with slashing horsepower from 750 down to 670. So with more mechanical grip and less power, we'll have a low degree of difficulty *unless* we get very hard tires with low grip and/or very low aerodynamic downforce. And I don't see either of those happening, frankly. So for short tracks and road courses, I expect the degree of difficulty to get watered down versus what we have in 2021.

For intermediate tracks, the 550 horse motors and big spoilers will return. We'll still have improved mechanical grip due to IRS and wider tires. I don't see where the hoped-for return of off-throttle time would come from. Like I said, I'll wait to see some races, but not optimistic for a return to NASCAR races being a driver-skill meritocracy. Just my (preliminary) opinion. What do y'all expect?
Bring the Hudson back!
 

StandOnIt

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Nascar has positioned themselves with this new car to be able to suck up most of the better talent in racing. Already a driver like Joey Hand is in the car for a practice of all things. More will come.
 

ChexOrWrex

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Nascar has positioned themselves with this new car to be able to suck up most of the better talent in racing. Already a driver like Joey Hand is in the car for a practice of all things. More will come.
Lol ok. Drivers have been saying the exact opposite since the inception of lower horsepower packages.

On the topic of Joey Hand, he’s hired as a road course ringer who already races Rick Ware’s sports cars. Takes some mental gymnastics to say that the next gen car brought him over.

The closest to “sucking up the better talent in racing” so far is a Euro NASCAR driver who races cars with 450hp.
 

StandOnIt

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Lol ok. Drivers have been saying the exact opposite since the inception of lower horsepower packages.

On the topic of Joey Hand, he’s hired as a road course ringer who already races Rick Ware’s sports cars. Takes some mental gymnastics to say that the next gen car brought him over.

The closest to “sucking up the better talent in racing” so far is a Euro NASCAR driver who races cars with 450hp.
Last time I looked, the Next Gen hasn't raced yet?
 

ChexOrWrex

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Only time will tell.

The potential is there.

We will see, we have seen drivers from different disciplines have more interest in NASCAR as of late. Never know what it might materialize into.
Theres an argument to be made that the cars are getting further away from having to mandhandle a big heavy stock car around a track and are now closer to what sportscar drivers are familiar with and their talent transfers over easier.

Thats not saying its bad or good, but that the argument exists.
 

Kiante

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Theres an argument to be made that the cars are getting further away from having to mandhandle a big heavy stock car around a track and are now closer to what sportscar drivers are familiar with and their talent transfers over easier.

Thats not saying its bad or good, but that the argument exists.
I still say Aussie Supercars are the closest thing without the massive rear spoiler on tighter road and street courses.

It's still not even remotely close to a sports car, its just a modernized stock car. It seems like its going in that direction, but we have IMSA for that full-on GT4 and GT3 action.

I bet these things are still cumbersome as hell to drive, it just looks easier because of the drivers behind the wheel.
 

Charlie Spencer

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Theres an argument to be made that the cars are getting further away from having to mandhandle a big heavy stock car around a track and are now closer to what sportscar drivers are familiar with and their talent transfers over easier.

Thats not saying its bad or good, but that the argument exists.
Manhandling these cars went away with the introduction of power steering. I'm also not saying that's good or bad, but I notice no one is asking to have it outlawed.
 

StandOnIt

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I still say Aussie Supercars are the closest thing without the massive rear spoiler on tighter road and street courses.

It's still not even remotely close to a sports car, its just a modernized stock car.
I believe they are a bit heavier than the current car or pretty close to the same weight. The balance is better though
 

Kiante

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I believe they are a bit heavier than the current car or pretty close to the same weight. The balance is better though
Is there an idea of the overall weight distribution of the NextGen compared to the Gen 6?

Now I'm really curious.
 

ChexOrWrex

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Is there an idea of the overall weight distribution of the NextGen compared to the Gen 6?

Now I'm really curious.
The new transaxle drivetrain design balances the weight between the front and rear axle. It’s designed almost identical to the new mid engine Vette.

The old cars were all front heavy due to the traditional drivetrain layout.
 

StandOnIt

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2nd day speeds
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FLRacingFan

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I'm a hater of NASCAR's current NA18D package for intermediate tracks, and have been since it was first previewed in May 2018. On short tracks and road courses, the current 750 horse package with low downforce produces good racing, IMO.

I'll take a wait-and-see attitude toward the 2022 on-track racing product, but my pessimism is growing. I'm all about the races being a stern contest of driving skill. The higher the degree of difficulty, the better I like it. And that means the cars need to be beasts with more power than tire, so the drivers have to brake for corners and then fight for traction at corner exit.

Next year at short tracks and road courses, we'll have substantial gains in mechanical grip due to independent rear suspension and wider tires... and combine that with slashing horsepower from 750 down to 670. So with more mechanical grip and less power, we'll have a low degree of difficulty *unless* we get very hard tires with low grip and/or very low aerodynamic downforce. And I don't see either of those happening, frankly. So for short tracks and road courses, I expect the degree of difficulty to get watered down versus what we have in 2021.

For intermediate tracks, the 550 horse motors and big spoilers will return. We'll still have improved mechanical grip due to IRS and wider tires. I don't see where the hoped-for return of off-throttle time would come from. Like I said, I'll wait to see some races, but not optimistic for a return to NASCAR races being a driver-skill meritocracy. Just my (preliminary) opinion. What do y'all expect?
Much of the driver feedback I’ve read so far is that the cars are and will be easier to drive and push, especially on road courses, but they may also be harder not to wreck - they are more prone to snap and less likely to be driven in a controlled slide. How hard guys are willing to drive, keeping in mind enhanced risk, will be interesting. The Charlotte oval test could be telling in that regard. Certainly not locking in any judgments either way right now though.
 

MAGICMILER

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Interesting I wonder why Wythe (picture below) over another dirt track
View attachment 58011
We stay with relatives in Wytheville when we go to Bristol, and the occasional Thanksgiving. A few years ago during our Bristol trip, our hosts surprised us with a trip to Wythe Raceway. We had a blast, and will definitely go back again. Everyone knew everyone, Southern hospitality, politeness and manners. Man, we desperately need a dirt track here in Southern New England... And a class of people like those fine folks are...
 

Mispeedway15

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I'm a hater of NASCAR's current NA18D package for intermediate tracks, and have been since it was first previewed in May 2018. On short tracks and road courses, the current 750 horse package with low downforce produces good racing, IMO.

I'll take a wait-and-see attitude toward the 2022 on-track racing product, but my pessimism is growing. I'm all about the races being a stern contest of driving skill. The higher the degree of difficulty, the better I like it. And that means the cars need to be beasts with more power than tire, so the drivers have to brake for corners and then fight for traction at corner exit.

Next year at short tracks and road courses, we'll have substantial gains in mechanical grip due to independent rear suspension and wider tires... and combine that with slashing horsepower from 750 down to 670. So with more mechanical grip and less power, we'll have a low degree of difficulty *unless* we get very hard tires with low grip and/or very low aerodynamic downforce. And I don't see either of those happening, frankly. So for short tracks and road courses, I expect the degree of difficulty to get watered down versus what we have in 2021.

For intermediate tracks, the 550 horse motors and big spoilers will return. We'll still have improved mechanical grip due to IRS and wider tires. I don't see where the hoped-for return of off-throttle time would come from. Like I said, I'll wait to see some races, but not optimistic for a return to NASCAR races being a driver-skill meritocracy. Just my (preliminary) opinion. What do y'all expect?
Like I said in the other thread, develop a 550 HP engine now so then it comes back to 750-800 when they go hybrid. That's all this is, basically putting an engine in place that's going to add a hybrid component in a few years. I think the symmetry of the car alone will make them more difficult to drive at 550 HP, up that to 750-800 HP with a hybrid and whoa. Right now these vehicles are simply too well built and too yawwed out
 

FLRacingFan

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Like I said in the other thread, develop a 550 HP engine now so then it comes back to 750-800 when they go hybrid. That's all this is, basically putting an engine in place that's going to add a hybrid component in a few years. I think the symmetry of the car alone will make them more difficult to drive at 550 HP, up that to 750-800 HP with a hybrid and whoa. Right now these vehicles are simply too well built and too yawwed out
I’d be surprised if the electric component were that extensive. Maybe a 40-60 HP spec unit - I don’t think they are trying to break the bank with their first foray into it. Even F1’s MGU-K will be at 160 HP for another five or so years.
 

Kiante

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I’d be surprised if the electric component were that extensive. Maybe a 40-60 HP spec unit - I don’t think they are trying to break the bank with their first foray into it. Even F1’s MGU-K will be at 160 HP for another five or so years.
Also, I think the original idea was to have a spec unit to across IndyCar, NASCAR, and IMSA.

It will be a slight boost, but as you said its all about cost effectiveness in this case. The power bump will be a nice addition as well, but as long as North American motorsports catches up in decent time.

That's all that really matters right now.
 

wi_racefan

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Not sure I understand this. Cars could be "swapped out" after 3 races. Swapped out where or to whom?

Think they mean the car has to have 3 starts before it can be sold to another team or I guess retired. I'm sure teams will find some advantage that a new chassis has over one with 20 starts. Not to mention I'm sure every chassis will be mapped out and determined which ones are better based on to which side of production tolerance they were made to. Keep the better ones and sell off the other ones after 3 starts

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
 

StandOnIt

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Could be. It's open to speculation with that 3 races statement. Maybe there will be more info on it. 7 active cars on a four car team seems a bit light also. There has been all four cars wrecked before, fairly rare, so why not a backup car at least for every team that has a car.
 
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